Tag Archives: exploration

Double Silo Quickie

I hit two silos a while back, figured I’d put them both together. The first was an old grain silo. I have no history on the actual building, but it looks to have been active before the 60’s and maybe even as far back as the 30’s. The inside was almost too dark to take photos:

We climbed up the hulking structure, crossing frighteningly decayed cement walkways to get to another section where we could climb to the top. I took a quick photo of some of the coolest industrial equipment I’d ever seen:

The relative darkness of the inside compared to the bright winter day made it difficult to take many photos. I snapped one more shot before leaving that I really ended up liking. It turned out looking like it was processed, but this went straight from my camera to my computer with only a little leveling, temperature correction, and sharpening in between:

The second silo, oddly, looks like a gigantic castle. We didn’t know exactly where it was, but we followed it’s hulking presence on the horizon until we finally were able to park across the street and wander to it from there. We walked along some tracks until we were right next to the structure.

The inside of the first part of the silo was dark and full of dirt. Long rains had obviously washed in every surrounding bit of soil, which cascaded in through the windows. Small holes in the concrete let the light in. Unfortunately, there was no way to the higher floors as time had taken its toll on the steel ladders, which were either sprawled on the floor or barely intact.

As we walked from the first section the second, I took a photo. The wind between them was unbelievable.

There was very little in the second area past the same dirt and holes in the first. Jordan pointed this out to me and I thought it was pretty hilarious.

To see more of my abandoned photos, check out my main site.

Chicago Hospital Complex Exploration pt. 2

We started the day with plans to explore two abandoned hospitals in the area. The hospital has been a historic point of Chicago since it was built and even had a popular TV sitcom based on it. The hallways were gigantic, but also very empty. Being a county hospital, the city had pinched every penny from the closure that they could.

There was almost nothing left but the structure of this building. Rooms stood completely empty with only a scrap or two of metal or a radiator against the wall.:

Making our way up to the top floor, we could see the Chicago skyline outside of the window. I wound my way through a small hallway to find an oddly placed auditorium that was probably used for the observation of surgeries at one point. The floor of the auditorium where the instructor once stood was now completely filled with what seemed to be heating equipment. A hulking wall of aluminum blocked us from going any further down the stairs.

The hallways were as gutted as the actual rooms. I have no idea why, but dirt was covering the ground of this 7th floor hallway.

We exited the first of our destinations and made our way to the second. This hospital, midway between the point where a building is closed and the point where demolition work starts, was much more interesting. It was full of leftover equipment, records, x-rays, film – you name it. Unfortunately, we were running low on daylight so we were forced to rush through.

The hospital felt as if everyone had just gotten up and left. Not a single room in the building that we were able to explore was completely empty. Chairs, piles of records, even medical equipment was just left to rot.

The furniture in the building was dated. Seems the last time that they actually refurnished the place was in the seventies, although I’m pretty sure it closed much more recently.

The halls were dark, full of furniture and debris. Peeling paint coats floors that have paint, other halls are lined with tile that has not yet fallen off.

Meet the most frightening CPR dummy that you’ll ever see.

One of the most surprising and incredible things that has ever happened to me while exploring suddenly happened. We were wandering around looking for a way to make it to the basement and something insane happened. We were in a dark stairwell. Dirty floors, peeling paint everywhere, no lights, darkness – suddenly, we opened a door and found ourself in one of the most pristine abandoned buildings that we had ever been in. It felt surreal, almost dreamlike. The colors on the walls were the same as they were when the building closed, the floors almost looked waxed. It was crazy. We were in a hurry (many windows, well lit), so I couldn’t get a great photo.

More to come of course.

To see more of my abandoned photos, check out my main site.

Indiana Exploration

Exploration Catch-Up first post:
First off, an abandoned hotel.



Second, we hit a schoolhouse in the area. Built in 1922, it has been shut down since somewhere around 1960.

This hallway is actually in the basement. Originally, it was made of poured concrete and could withstand the blast of an atomic bomb.

Some of the cool paintings we found in the building:


For some reason, a single chair and desk were all that was left in this room. The floor was drooping pretty badly, so I didn’t spend too much time tromping around up there. There was a hole in the ground that led to a classroom below:

There were a lot of weird things painted around the building:

One last photo before we left the school – Jordan taking a shot in the stairwell:

Dead Mall: Exploration of an Abandoned Shopping Center

Note from Kyle: I’ve kept this post up for archive purposes, but I’ve deleted the photos since I revisited Dixie Square mall in higher resolution on my main blog, which can be found here: http://www.cityeyesphoto.com/3298/dead-mall-exploration-of-the-abandoned-dixie-square-mall/

Went out to Chicago again this weekend. Took a few photos of some new places.
First destination – An abandoned shopping mall. Once in an area of great promise, now the area has descended into high crime and depression. The mall, used for the chase scene in the Blues Brothers movie, closed in 1978 and since then had been the site of a murder, multiple rapes, and a few other very nasty things until the police station moved nearby.

Fire damage is apparent in the building and the once sturdy concrete upper floor has caved in at multiple sites within.

A sign hangs from the position where it once stood. Vandalism has removed much of what was once in the mall, but sometimes you’ll stumble upon signs of what used to be:

Walls are torn down – only flaps of wallpaper and wood grid remains in some areas:

This room was particularly interesting to me. I’m not sure if I’m right, but I think that the blue tint in my photo is due to the holes in the ceiling becoming a giant pinhole camera type device. The blue and white is actually a projection of the sky above:

An escalator, once part of a bustling JC Penny, now stands silent. Water collecting at the bottom makes for a tricky climb as well as corroding metal steps:

Two escalators cross in a large department store area:

Colorful murals and wallpaper adorn the dreary halls of the old mall:

A sign advertising “beautiful things” still holds true, in a way.

My second destination was, as far as I could tell, an abandoned chemical research factory. I’m told that it was once an oil company, but I can’t for the life of me tell exactly what they did in there because I found all sorts of obscure chemicals not related at all to petroleum.

A piano is in the hallway across from a lab. I have no idea why it’s there:

Some insane machinery fills up one of the rooms in the building:

Various equipment, bottles, and papers create shadows in this room. It smelled of sulfur, so I didn’t stay in there for long:

Notice the “asb 9” in this photo. I’m pretty sure that means that there was asbestos present and needed to be removed. Still, the least of our worries:

As always, you know where to find more and larger.

Gary Indiana Exploration 08-31-08

Ok, as you guys know, I went out to the most abandoned city in America again on Saturday. Said I’d post a few photos. As always, more photos and larger versions available at my flickr stream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/cityeyes
Here they are:

A shutter, busted out from either wear through time or a vandal, sits in the center of the hallway of an abandoned apartment complex connected to one of the most famous theaters of the 1950’s.

Stage lights litter the floor near the exit to the theater. I’m surprised they haven’t been broken, but many explorers that come to this area of town are dedicated enough to leave things where they were found and smart enough to watch their step – you never know when you’ll hit some rotten wood and burst through the floor.

The main hall of a disused auditorium. This is actually the first time that I’ve visited this area. The actual “auditorium” part of the building is completely overgrown with weeds. The stairs of the auditorium were carved out of ornate limestone. It almost seems as if someone had swept them because they were oddly clean considering the condition of the building that they were in.

Obligatory Peeling Paint Shot. I don’t usually like to take these, but the lighting in this room was too good to pass up. I also couldn’t get over how green that paint was.

A gigantic pile of clothes sits among many others in the abandoned warehouse. I ran into another explorer on the same day and he filled me in on the whole situation – apparently some woman had promised to fly all of these articles of clothing over to third world countries and instead ditched it all in abandoned buildings across the city. Sneaky. Equally messy – piles of paper littered the floors in what seemed to be a storage room. Receipts from the 50’s on are present in this room.

Andrew sees the light – the dust from the floor of the old warehouse highlights two beams of light which happen to fall right on my friend. In another room, a door sits – signatures dotting the entire surface. Some of them even date back to the 50’s.

Ruins of an abandoned church – Gary, Indiana

CMC was shut down in the 70’s due to a lack of attendance and suffered a fire in ’97 (thanks to Corby for the correction!). To this day,  stands in the streets of Gary, Indiana as a relic of the past – the vast sanctuary, shadowy hallways, and decaying innards a testament to the ravages of time.

After about three minutes of driving around a bit aimlessly, I saw a spire above a few old looking buildings about a street away from me. I navigated my way over and found myself at the base of one of the biggest and most beautiful abandoned buildings that I’d ever seen. The second I ducked into a side door, I knew that I’d found it. To the left, a stage littered with all sorts of clothing and wreckage. To the right, a small room leading into a huge sanctuary.

I left after snapping a few photos and returned later with Elise. Here are the results:

First, we hit the sanctuary. It was beautiful, cold, and quiet. Snow drifted in through holes in the   roof and settled on the brick floors.

Following that, we made our way to other areas of the building. The theater, long destroyed, showed no sign of snow, but the upstairs auditorium was completely coated with a thin dusting.

On our way down, we saw a makeshift living room set up. I assume someone moved this stuff for a photo or something, but I’d like to think a crazy man lives here in the summer.

Even long abandoned and freezing cold, animals make this beautiful building their home.

I plan on getting back there as soon as possible to take more photos – we had to give up eventually because the sun was quickly fading and our fingers were completely numb from the cold. I plan on exploring more of Gary with my camera soon in the future, as well as the surrounding areas.

Technorati Tags: ,,,,,,,,